Posts in: Politics

As a general rule, real estate agents randomly texting folks at 9:30pm on a weekend asking if his house is for sale is not an effective strategy of cold calling potential leads.


What's in my RSS right now

Earlier in the week, I posted on what apps and subscriptions I have currently, going into 2022. I thought it was helpful to clarify for myself where my financial commitments were going. Even free apps will use data—either data that I pay for, or data that I create in using it—or my time, both of which have financial implications. I thought, therefore, it might also be helpful for me to sketch out what I am consuming in RSS right now.

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Here’s a (possibly) mind-blowing fact: just about every time you load a web page on a browser, or click to a new experience inside an app, there’s code being run that sends your data to an ad exchange, which then broadcasts that data to hundreds of potential bidders (themselves connected to countless actual advertisers). For every click of yours, picture a dense bundle of data going into the cloud and instantly duplicating into hundreds of copies to thousands of servers, each one accessing millions of rows of data to figure out who you are. That’s the pulsing, arterial information flow of the modern mobile internet, and it beats billions of times a day.

“To Catch A Priest,” The Pull Request


Jobs outlook for the summer

Lot of intereesting stuff on the jobs data, From the Washington Post, via @Pratik earlier today: It’s not a ‘labor shortage.’ It’s a great reassessment of work in America. But Scott Sumner called it awhile ago Because millions of unemployed workers in low pay service sector jobs earn more on unemployment than they did on their previous jobs, and because most of those jobs are unpleasant, employment will likely remain quite depressed all summer, before bouncing back in the fall.

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The Crypto State?

Bruno Maçaes, writes at City Journal But here are my provisional suggestions on how things could go. The critical issue is, of course, taxation. It is here that crypto issues the more determinate challenge to the core powers of the modern nation-state. Some in the crypto space believe that the slow erosion of the state’s tax powers will eventually determine its final collapse, at least as we know it today.

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Why the debate might have been the best in 20 years

It’s been a busy news week, and I forgot to post this. I wrote up a short piece arguing what has been a minority view on the debate. While the debate may have been overshadowed by the growing number of cases inside the upper-reaches of American government, I still wanted to get this note out here.